The Mighty: Marvel Reveals Superhero ‘The Unstoppable Wasp’ Has Bipolar Disorder

In the fifth edition of the “Unstoppable Wasp” comic, protagonist Nadia Van Dyne (known as the Unstoppable Wasp in superhero form) comes to terms with her mental illness.

Jeremy Whitley, writer of “Unstoppable Wasp,” said it was important to him and his editor to represent mental illness in a superhero’s life — particularly because in the past, comics have often associated mental illness with villains. …

Continue reading Juliette Virzi’s article at The Mighty.

This article from The Mighty discusses Nadia’s Bipolar Disorder. It also includes links to other articles about fictional characters dealing with mental health issues.

New York Times: “A Marvel Hero Copes With Bipolar Disorder”

In Issue No. 5 of the Unstoppable Wasp, which arrives in comic stores on Wednesday, the title hero comes to a realization: “I need help. I think I’m bipolar … and I don’t think I can handle this alone.”

Gustines, George G. “A Marvel Hero Copes With Bipolar Disorder”, The New York Times. 20 Feb. 2019.

Marvel.Com: Exploring Mental Illness with “Unstoppable Wasp”

I got a chance to discuss The Unstoppable Wasp, and specifically, Nadia’s bipolar diagnosis, with Marvel.com.

Since the very beginning, Marvel Comics has presented its Super Heroes as, above all else, people. 


Matt Murdock manages his blindness, Bruce Banner copes with his anger, and Charles Xavier contends with his paralysis while, concurrently, Daredevil protects Hell’s Kitchen, the Hulk smashes Super Villains, and Professor X leads a school of gifted youngsters.


While these characteristics are what help make our heroes human, they do not define them or weaken them; they’re simply a part of who they are.


In the same way, today’s UNSTOPPABLE WASP #5 sees its eponymous hero at a crossroads in her life. As Nadia Van Dyne encounters her mental illness for the first time, she and the Agents of G.I.R.L. grapple with its powerful effects while never losing sight of their love for—and responsibilities to—themselves and each other. 


Written by Jeremy Whitley with art by Gurihiru, this story—covered today in the New York Times—is set to change everything about Nadia’s life.

Stevens, Tim. “Exploring Mental Illness with “Unstoppable Wasp”, Marvel.com. 19 Feb. 2019

You can read the entirety of the interview with Tim Stevens at Marvel.com.

Heroic Girls: The Unstoppable Wasp’s Jeremy Whitley

I get to talk to Heroic Girls about the return of The Unstoppable Wasp – which the site lists as one of the Best Graphic Novels of 2018 for Kids and Teens. We discuss the importance of diversity in comic representation.

Heroic Girls: One of the core ideas of Heroic Girls is that by providing better and more varied role models for girls, pop culture can have a positive impact on the real world. Looking over your body of work, is it safe to say that you share that belief?

Jeremy Whitley: No doubt. That was part of my motivation for creating Princeless in the first place. I was looking to create a comic with a heroine whom my daughter could see her self in. Adrienne is a princess, but she is also a warrior. She doesn’t need a prince to save her.
Unstoppable Wasp as a book had largely the same mission statement. We had Nadia and Janet (the original Wasp), but we also introduced a cast of other girl geniuses that reflected the real world population of New York City. We have Taina (our Puerto Rican engineer and robot maker), Shay (our African-American physicist), Ying (our Chinese chemist), and Priya (our Indian American botanist). The group reflects both a diversity of experiences and a diversity of expertise. Everybody is a bit different, but they have two shared passions: science and saving the world.

Marcotte, John. “Interview: The Unstoppable Wasp’s Jeremy Whitley”. Heroic Girls. 8 Jan. 2019

Check out the entire interview over at Heroic Girls. You can also get a peek at the fabulous Unstoppable Wasp cosplay from Tamara Robertson – real life Science Hero and Agent of G.I.R.L.

Talking Comics: The Unstoppable Wasp #1

Talking Comics reviews the return of The Unstoppable Wasp.

Whitley once again delivers another comic full of spunk and fun. The banter entertained, and the action was engaging. All of the characters sport their own personalities. Even the most underappreciated avenger, Jarvis, returns to teach Nadia how to drive. The art by Gurihiru pops with vibrant colors and cool designs. The letters by Joe Caramanga suit the tone of the comic perfectly.

Verdict: Buy! This comic was the best thing I read this week, maybe this month. Whitley is doing even better than last time, and this series is top shelf quality. Buy it, read it, and when you finish it, give it to someone else. This comic is the perfect gift for boys and girls of all ages.

KrisK. “The Unstoppable Wasp #1 – Review” Talking Comics. 19 October 2018.

WMQ&A: See the Shining Light

Stoked to sit in on episode 35 of WMQ&A from the good folks at WMQ Comics. We get to talk about Rainbow Brite, The Unstoppable Wasp, and, of course, Princeless.

Need more of this podcast in your life? You can follow @wmqcomics on Twitter and Facebook, and you can follow Dan on Twitter @danielpgrote.